Blogs
    11 posts
Push notifications to your PWA with ASP.NET Core 2.0 and Aurelia
In this blog post we will extend the functionality of the Progressive Web App (PWA) we’ve build in the previous blog post by adding push notifications. Or to use the appropriate terminology, make it more progressive. Push notifications are well known in the mobile world but with the support for Push API by Chrome and Firefox we now have push for the web. ......
From SPA to PWA with ASP.NET Core 2.0 and Aurelia
Last October I visited the TechDays conference in Amsterdam. One of the sessions I attended was Jeff Burtoft’s on Progressive Web Apps (PWA). He did a talk on the same subject last year and I remember finding it interesting back then but the tech was fairly new and browser support wasn’t great so I didn’t follow up on it. This year was different though, all major browsers are working on implementing the API’s required to run a PWA, it seems the time was right to start exploring Progressive Web Apps. I left Jeff’s session inspired and I was eager to get started with Progressive Web Apps myself. I was already working on a personal project to get (more) familiar with technologies like ASP.NET Core 2.0 (with JavaScript services), webpack, CosmosDB, Auth0 and Aurelia so I decided to transform this Single Page Application (SPA) into a Progressive Web App (PWA). PWA - a very short intro It’s not the intention of this blog post to give you a full intro on PWAs, there are plenty of great resources out there doing that already. In short a PWA works on any device and enhances functionality progressively based on the capabilities of the browser and device.......
Starting an Azure VM from the Cloud Shell
I have an Azure Virtual Machine (VM) running in an Azure DevTest Lab that I use as my development machine. The VM will deallocate every evening to save costs and I restart it every morning when I start working. This morning I went to the Azure portal and clicked the start button as usual, but this time it wouldn’t start. I tried multiple times but didn’t get beyond the Starting virtual machine message. I googled around a bit and found a StackOverflow post suggesting to use Powershell to start the VM. I hadn’t used the Cloud Shell yet, which is available in the portal, so I decided to give that a try. To my surprise and relieve (I was already dreading a re-install of my dev machine) it only took three Azure CLI commands in the Cloud Shell to get my VM running again. ......