Sending IoT data real-time to the browser with Azure IoT Hub, Azure Functions and SignalR Service
In this blog post I would like to show how we can display data in a browser in real-time after it has been sent by an IoT device. We will see that this isn’t difficult at all if we use and combine the right Azure services. We don’t even have to write a lot of code for it. ......
Bot Framework v4 – Continuous Deployment: Part 2 – ARM template and Azure DevOps Release Pipeline
This post is the second part of a two-part blog post. In the first blog post we mainly focused on laying the groundwork for the release of the Bot. We made some adjustments to an existing Bot Project from the Bot Builder Samples repository and created a build pipeline in Azure DevOps. In this post we will focus on deploying the Bot to Azure. We will create an ARM template to declaratively describe the resources we need to provision on Azure and we will create the actual release pipeline in Azure DevOps. Creating the ARM template The build pipeline we created in the first part of this blog post produced an artifact which contains our build Bot project in the form of a zip file. We can use this artifact to deploy the Bot to Azure, but at the moment we don’t have anything to deploy to yet. Let’s do a quick inventory of the required resources. When we create a Web App Bot from the Azure portal, Azure will create a Bot Service and an App Service Web App. The App Service will host and run our Bot and it will provide an endpoint to be used by the Bot Service to connect to the Bot.......
Bot Framework v4 – Continuous Deployment: Part 1 – Bot Project and Azure DevOps Build Pipeline
If you read my previous blog post you know I have been working on a Bot with the Microsoft Bot Framework. After some time developing the Bot it became time to start thinking about how to release the Bot to Azure. I always like to automate the provisioning of Azure resources as part of a release and I’ve used Azure Resource Manager templates (ARM templates) for this in other projects. ......
Bot Framework v4 – Adding Application Insights to a Bot
Recently I had the opportunity to work on a conversational agent (bot or chatbot) with the Microsoft Bot Framework and the Azure Bot Service. For this particular project we decided to use the new version of the Framework that went GA at Ignite 2018 and build our bot with the Bot Builder C# SDK (v4). Because this version is still relatively new, some of documentation and samples aren’t completely up-to-date. While I was working on the project I could find bits and pieces of information in the docs and samples but sometimes end-to-end guidance was missing. That’s why I decided to write some blog posts with my findings to hopefully help some of you to get up and running quickly with version 4 of the Framework and the Bot Builder SDK. One of the changes in this new version is the use of .bot files to store and manage secrets and configuration information for bots and any external service it uses. According to Microsoft all bot configuration should be stored in the .bot file, however when I was reading up on how to add Application Insights, I found appsettings.json still being used. In this blog post we will add the Application Insights configuration settings to the .......
FIFA World Cup Tweet analysis with Azure Cognitive Services, Logic Apps and Power BI
Introduction Recently I read a blog post from Henk Boelman in which he uses Azure Logic Apps and Cognitive Services to determine the sentiment of tweets with a specific hashtag. I wanted to play with Logic Apps for a while myself but hadn’t found the time or a nice use case yet. At the time of reading Henk’s blog post, the FIFA World Cup 2018 was well on it’s way and had almost progressed to the 1⁄8 finals. I already noticed most match hashtags in the group phase were trending so one of the upcoming 1⁄8 final matches seemed like a nice opportunity to finally start my own experiment with Azure Logic Apps and Cognitive Services. The idea was to pick a certain 1⁄8 final match, collect tweets about it using the game’s Twitter hashtag and analyze them with Cognitive Services to gain insight into the course of the match or in some remarkable events that happened during the match. In this blog post I will show you how to create the Logic App and how to integrate Cognitive Services. We will run the Logic App during a 1⁄8 final match. Then we will visualize and analyze the results in order to hopefully draw a number of sensible conclusions about the match, solely based on the tweets.......